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Archive for the ‘PHOTOGRAPHY: Inspiration and Assignments | In The Field | How To’s’ Category

ARCHIVED IMAGES

April 3, 2018 5 comments

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Every couple of months I will review my archived images. Sometimes I will just pick a random category and really scrutinize the images. Other times I will review several categories and just look at them to bring back memories of the time and place. I have found it to be an inspiring and rewarding activity.

My latest foray into the depths of one of my hard drives was looking through images in my  Weather folder. Some of those photos brought back memories of a very stormy evening which started out as a beautiful sunny late summer day.

Then Mother Nature decided it was time for a change. It was after all, early evening, and there is no better time for change than early evening. Dark ominous clouds moved in, the winds picked up and it started to rain. Well, really it was more like a monsoon. The weather app on my phone started alerting me that severe weather was on its way. Really severe weather. Mesocylclones were all over the map. These are large air masses associated with tornados. And these air masses were very close. Like a mile away close. It really is best to stay inside in these situations. Besides I was still at work so I had no choice. But in reality I wanted to photograph what was happening outside. So I made the best of the situation and took cover under the front porch of the store where I work. At least the roof offered some protection from the rain. The wind…not so much. I kept a vigilant eye on the radar but none of the rotating clouds formed into actual tornados.

Following the mantra of photographer friend of mine Ed Heaton, “Learning to capture light will make extraordinary images from ordinary subjects” I looked for a light source that would make for an interesting image. I wasn’t able to capture lightning strikes so I had to look elsewhere.

The headlights from a customer’s truck were shining at the perfect angle to highlight the raindrops striking the parking lot. And after the storm passed through the area, the sun highlighted the remaining cloud cover with fantastic light and color.

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IN THE FIELD: SPRING IS HERE?

March 22, 2018 11 comments

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The official Spring Equinox for this year 2018 occurred on March 20 at 12:15 pm Eastern time. On that particular day it did not come in like a lion but more like a lamb. Around where I live it was quiet. Mostly sunny but still cool. Temps where in the low 40’s with some puffy clouds floating above. The puffy clouds were just a pre-curser to what would follow later that day.

Following the puffy clouds was a storm front coming in from the west. As the day progressed, it became more overcast and the temperature began to head towards the freezing mark. Not much happened in the daylight hours, but during the wee hours of the night, a few snow flurries made an appearance. Just before what would normally be sunup, the snow began to fly. And boy o’ boy did it fly. The snow came down from the sky for the better part of 18 hours! The storm was one of four nor’easters to unleash their fury in the month of March this year. The snowfall totals in my area were anywhere from 10-13.5 inches.

I recently read a profound quote which seems to say it all.

The first day of spring is one thing,

and the first spring day is another.

The difference between them is

sometimes as great as a month.

Henry Van Dyke (1852-1933)

IN THE FIELD: Well Wadda Ya Know

May 25, 2016 13 comments

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I walked out my front door this morning and looked to my left and this is what I saw! Just a few hours ago this was a bud waiting to open.

The back story to this Iris is kind of interesting. My Mom had acquired this variety of heirloom Iris many years ago. When she moved from her home to a town-home, we dug a bunch of the rhizomes from her garden and planted them in her new garden. About ten years ago we divided some of them and transplanted them from her garden to ours  at our old house. About two years ago when we moved to temporary digs while our new house was being built, I dug as many of the rhizomes from our garden as I could and put them away in storage. Apparently I didn’t tend to them properly and they all dried up. Drat.

Mom to the rescue again. Last fall I was digging Iris rhizomes again and transplanted some from her garden to our new garden in front of our new house. The results have been amazing. I think I have found the perfect spot for them to flourish.

IN THE FIELD: Weekend Weather

May 13, 2016 9 comments

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The weather here has been pretty gloomy for the last couple of weeks. It is either raining, or foggy, or overcast. In fact the weather forecast is for all of the above  the entire weekend. It’s not all bad news though. With these conditions, the light has been perfect for photography.

Have a wonderful weekend everyone!

IN THE FIELD: Rain and Tulips

May 3, 2016 8 comments

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It’s been raining off and on for the last several days…and will be for the rest of the week.  I figure that’s no reason to put the camera away just because its a little damp outside.

There are several reasons I like to play with the camera on rainy days and in inclement weather. The light is more even with no contrasty shadows. And there is usually no one else around except for other dedicated or what some folks would call crazy photographers.

Ok I’ll admit it wasn’t actually “raining” when I took this shot. It was kind of what I call “Maine rain.”  Maine rain is in between a soaking rain and heavy fog. The fog/mist is heavy enough to get everything that is not covered…good and wet.

If you are going to be out in this kind of rain, it’s a good idea to use some kind of protection for your camera and lens. I could be something as simple as a plastic bag you get at the produce section of the grocery store. Or something made specifically for cameras. I like to use a rain sleeve from OP/TECH USA. Super inexpensive and they work.

IN THE FIELD: WELCOMING COMMITTEE

April 29, 2016 12 comments

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Last fall I planted a bunch of spring bulbs along the walkway that leads from our driveway to the front door. The original plan was for 100 or so bulbs to be planted among the cherry laurels and holly bushes growing in the garden beds.

As luck would have it, the company we were going to order the bulbs from was having a buy one-get-one sale on several varieties and colors. And believe it or not, the varieties we wanted were on sale!

Oh darn.

And then, I was in the local hardware store and I just happened to see these purple tulips on sale. Had to get them…two packages.

It turns out I planted over 220 spring bulbs to add a bit of color figuring that would make a pretty good statement.

The plantings included grape hyacinths, daffodils and multiple types and colors of tulips.

This grouping nearest the driveway started to open this past weekend.

IN THE FIELD: IRON HORSES

February 22, 2016 4 comments

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About an hour from where I live is a major freight yard for the Norfolk Southern railroad.

There is usually a lot of activity with various locomotives moving freight cars of all sorts from one track to another and coupling them together in long trains headed for destinations around the country.

Although you can not get up close to the equipment due to security reasons, there are a few places in the parking area that provide good vantage points looking east or west. A zoom or telephoto lens comes in real handy for close ups and for compressing long distance perspectives. It’s a great spot for railfanning.

It was an overcast day when I took this photo and the light was pretty flat. So I decided to use black and white to better capture the mood.