IN THE FIELD: Forecast…Fog

Early one morning while vacationing on the coast of Maine, my wife and I went down to the docks to see the boats and ships off for their daily sail. The fog was thick, but for the folks there, it was nothing unusual. There were lobstermen, fishermen, and deckhands bustling about, getting ready for a day out at sea.

We hung around the docks chatting with the fishermen, but kept our conversations short since everyone wanted to leave port before the tide went out. The fishermen gave us inside information on where the locals shopped for fresh seafood. And later in the day we did visit several of those secret places.

This is an older photo I shot on slide film before the digital age. Due to the low light levels, the telephoto lens I was using, and the floating dock I was standing on, the use of a tripod was necessary. Any bit of motion would have been magnified. Luckily the seas were calm. I was able to hand-hold shots when I was using shorter, brighter lenses, which is much easier when on a busy dock.

The ship in the photo is a historic three masted wooden schooner built in 1941. She spent over 40 years fishing offshore, most notably the Grand Banks and George’s Banks in the Atlantic. After her fishing career, she was converted to a passenger vessel for the windjammer trade in Maine. At the time I photographed the ship, she was named the Natalie Todd. She has since sailed to the west coast and been renamed American Pride. Her new home port is in Long Beach California as part of the American Heritage Marine Institute.

 

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  1. June 20, 2012 at 9:15 am

    Arrrrrrrrrr matey! Great shot.

  2. June 20, 2012 at 9:25 am

    Shiver me timbers….I want to sail that ship!!!

  3. June 20, 2012 at 9:43 am

    That is a beautiful ship..

    • June 20, 2012 at 10:43 am

      It sure is…the schooners are my favorite class of ship. But then again…just about any boat will do!

  4. June 20, 2012 at 9:45 am

    Great photo!
    Even if I don’t like fog, here looks pretty nice. 😀

    • June 20, 2012 at 10:44 am

      Thanks Cornel, the fog lifted in the late morning and it turned out to be beautiful day!

  5. June 20, 2012 at 10:55 am

    I love this image – so much mystery and timelessness about it. Our daughter, Leonie, is kayaking around the coast of Maine this week!

    • June 21, 2012 at 10:02 am

      Thanks Jo, It’s one of my favorite images of Maine. I’m with your daughter in spirit…kayaking in Maine is something I have wanted to do for a long time.

  6. June 20, 2012 at 11:35 am

    A beauiful photo, David. I love this type of ‘seascape’ photo.

    • June 21, 2012 at 10:04 am

      Thanks Bob, I haven’t been up in Maine for a few years so I think I will have to hit the archives for more seascape images. I need a fix!!!

  7. June 20, 2012 at 12:04 pm

    Beautiful, moody, and serene. This is one of my favourites of yours David.

    • June 21, 2012 at 10:07 am

      Thank you Meanderer, it’s one of my favorites also. As busy as the folks were on the docks, it was remarkably quiet that morning. I suppose the fog really muffles sounds.

  8. June 20, 2012 at 1:14 pm

    Hi David, she is indeed a beauty and has an illustrious history. Also love the moodiness of the fog. Was that hard on the camera -did you have to take precautions to keep everything dry?

    • June 21, 2012 at 10:10 am

      She is pretty…I have a fondness for wooden boats. For camera protection…the lens cap was used a lot and I just used a hand towel draped over everything while it was on the tripod. Hand-held- I just stuck it under my jacket.

      • June 21, 2012 at 10:48 am

        Yes, I had my camera under my coat when I shot the pheasant.It was sprinkling and was shocked how wet it got-a towel plus a plastic bag would be good additions to my camera bag.

  9. June 20, 2012 at 5:53 pm

    Great shot! Such beautiful calmness in this photo – the fog doesn’t overpower the soft mood. It’s fascinating to learn the history – knowing a story gives things more life, character and personality.

    • June 21, 2012 at 10:17 am

      Thanks Fergie, I have to admit I love this shot. The fog was heavier in some areas of the harbor than others. Odd. Where the schooner was docked I had a pretty clear view with the more dense fog behind it. The ship does indeed have an interesting history…I thought you guys would enjoy a tidbit of info about her!

  10. June 21, 2012 at 1:05 am

    That’s one of the greatest moods of the sea!

    • June 21, 2012 at 10:19 am

      It sure is…I get all goofy when I am around the ocean and boats. Especially wooden boats!
      I would love to move to the coast so I could experience the various moods more often.

  11. June 22, 2012 at 10:22 am

    Oh I love the mood on this photo. There’s a certain mystery feel to it.

    • June 25, 2012 at 10:36 am

      Thanks Gracie, I love this shot too…it’s hanging on the wall behind me!

  12. June 23, 2012 at 11:26 am

    That is very beautiful and I love the subtlety of the colours 🙂

    • June 25, 2012 at 10:43 am

      Thanks MyBeautiful, I love the “feel” this photo has…I only have a few shots of this ship (all taken the same morning).

  13. June 26, 2012 at 6:29 am

    What a beauty! And so mysterious in the fog! I love boats, I could probably live on one 😀

  14. June 26, 2012 at 11:54 am

    Love this shot……boat, water, fog! A lovely combination!

    • June 26, 2012 at 3:27 pm

      I’m with you Donna…what could be better than boats, water and fog…when we used to come down Rt. 301, I used to drool as we would go past Kent Island and see all the marinas etc.

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